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Start of a new year and it looks like more of the same January 18, 2010

Posted by jvmullin in 1.
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When you have been out of work for more than a year things can start to look very dismal. Some markets are picking up but very slowly. Other markets are still stagnant. The management of some companies are still trying to figure out their next move in this uncertain economy.

Wall Street and the big banks are claiming they are back and healthy while a large number of small banks are going under.  We do not know what to believe anymore. The unemployment numbers are going down but then what is that based on and who does it include or exclude. There will be another graduating class in a few months and the outlook for them is bleak. They could go back home but then their parents may still be unemployed and it would just increase the burden.

The government is slow at doing the right things to energize the job market and what they have done so far hasn’t worked. Tax incentives for businesses has historically never created the number of jobs it was intended to. But the government, never being one to learn anything from history, will do it again. The monies promised to small business or to start-ups is either non-existent or disguised so that it is very difficult to find it.

I am optimistic that I can find a job. I will once again look over my resume to see how I can make it better. To better sell what I can do for a company. My expertise is in new product introduction (concept to market) and streamlining efficiency. I am very good at finding ways to reduce cost, implement cost saving initiatives, and make processes run better. One would think that in this economy I would be the one person that companies would seek out to help them.  In this economy it is the perfect time to have someone like me working for you. But alas it has not happened. I guess I am not selling it correctly on my resume.

I also will be working on a better branding statement for myself.

For the rest of my fellow seekers I suggest you do the same. Take time to analyze what is working and keep it. Analyze also what is not working try to understand why. It may need a tweak or the effort put into may need to be reduced. It may also need to be discarded as it will never work for you.

We must practice our pitch, our networking skills and interviewing.

We must  persevere!

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Comments»

1. Mike Strout - January 18, 2010

My optimism is turning me into a pessimist! I’m still losing clients to the young and inexperienced but getting the phone calls from the clients asking me to bail them (my replacements) out!
I can reinvent myself with my knowlege and new concept but to do that takes money and to attract investors I need a degree, an advisory board and a business plan that’s written in a “language” I’ll never understand!
I have 36 productive years in my industry but need a BFA or MFA in Fine Arts to be a followspot operator!
It’s getting harder to stay positive when the sheer stupidity of the circumstances are so negative!! Thanks for listening, Mike

jvmullin - January 18, 2010

I feel your pain Mike. I think we are in a few groups together on LinkedIn as well.
I find it hard to stay optimistic when you read all the stupid things CEOs are doing that destroy companies or put more people out of work. You wonder if anyone has a clue anymore how to run a business. But these are the people we have to go work for. I see it as our jobs right know is to persuade these people that in order for them to succeed they need us. The other problem is we are fighting so many misconceptions and perceived notions and stereotyping and throw in age discrimination,which is based on everything previously mentioned anyway, and one wonders how we can stay optimistic.
Because we have to. The alternative is worse, depression despair that will lead to poor health. We are good people and deserve better than what we have bee dealt. We were not the ones that caused this the business leaders and shareholders were. However, as usual we are the ones that pay the brunt of their poor management decisions.

2. Mike Strout - January 18, 2010

We are connected on linkedIn plus NE Networkers, Startup Spec, Job and career and Job Board!
You’ve commented on my discussion 36 yrs exp. vs 20 something!
I follow your writing because it make sense and sometimes helps me refocus. At 54 yrs old I need all the help I can Get. Thanks for the encouragement, Mike


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